Mental Health Resources For Minorities; Sayreville Clothing Drive

PART ONE

1. Therapy For Black Girls
Therapy For Black Girls is a podcast, community, and therapist directory started by Joy Harden Bradford, who hopes to bridge the gap between black women and therapy. Thanks to her podcast and directory, it’s easy to find a culturally-informed therapist to discuss mental health issues that are often unique to black women, like racism in the workplace and dealing with race-informed misogyny.

2. Therapy For Black Men
Therapy For Black Men is aimed at helping black men find a therapist who is informed about the unique mental health issues that black men face. With black men four times more likely to commit suicide than black women, breaking the stigma against seeking mental health treatment is especially pertinent.

3. Melanin and Mental Health
Melanin & Mental Health was founded by two black women therapists to promote mental and emotional healing in black and Latinx communities through multi-city events, a therapist directory, and a podcast. The organization wants to bridge the gap between black and brown identities and mental health treatment through de-stigmatization and building community.

4. Open Path Collective
While not aimed specifically at people of color, Open Path Collective helps to ease the financial burden that often comes with therapy. With sliding scale costs, they seeks to be a safe space for marginalized identities to receive therapy. (Minorities, especially African Americans, are less likely to have health insurance.) If the cost of therapy is intimidating, this is a great place to start.

5. Ehthel’s Club
Ethel’s Club is a social and wellness club aimed at uplifting community, creativity, and health among people of color. With the physical clubhouse has closed due to the pandemic, the club has shifted to providing virtual wellness events to members, and even more recently, free mental health resources to non-members.

sayrevilleClothingDrive2020

Coronavirus NJ: Red Cross Online Grief Counseling; Tattoo Lockdown Lifted
African-Americans, Racism, Pandemics, and Mental Health